Do You Have What it Takes to Make it Through Four Years of College?

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When you are on the brink of graduating from high school, people will begin to ask your long-term plans for the future. You may have parents or others pressuring you to continue your education in college, and you also may feel an internal drive to attend college as well, especially if you have a lot of friends who are doing the same. The real question is, are you going to make it through a four year college?

The college life isn’t necessarily for everyone, even though there is certainly a school and course of study for just about everyone. If you can’t make yourself study or are no longer interested in structured learning, then college simply may not be for you. An important part of that decision-making comes in trying to determine what you hope to accomplish in life. There are innumerable means of making money; however, most require a collegiate background and degree.

College is expensive, but it is difficult to measure the college experience on a cost-to-benefits ratio. Many people have experiences from college that they consider priceless. Others waste a great deal of money by failing in school, winding up both in debt and several years behind others who didn’t bother to go to college. Then there are those who are actually in the work force for years before finally pursuing a college education. Try to determine in advance which scenario is most similar to you.

Here are a few basic questions to ask yourself when considering college:

– Do I have the initiative it takes to study hard without quitting when classes and work from them become difficult?

– Am I interested in a career that requires a college degree?

– Considering the career you want, how much additional income are you likely to generate over your lifetime with a college degree than you would without one?

– Do I really want to go to college, or am I letting someone pressure me into going against my better judgment?

– How much debt will I likely incur by attending college?

– Will my eventual career earn enough money over time to pay off my college debt in a reasonable amount of time?

Consider the answers to these questions and weigh the probable benefits of college against the costs. If someone else is paying for your education, then it is a good idea to go unless you know that you will not succeed.

If you are in school and decide you simply can’t bear to continue, try taking a semester off or transferring to another college. Once you’ve already started paying for a college education, you will have wasted a lot of money and time if you don’t eventually Alternatively, you can get started your professional career and still be a part time student and earn that degree over a longer period of time.

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